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PART 1 - 1.1 - Genesis of the analytical model :: 1.2 - Description of the analytical model :: 1.3 - A practice of analysis in the tonal harmonic discourse from Bach to Wagner :: 1.4 - By way of a general conclusion


1.3 - A practice of analysis in the tonal harmonic discourse from Bach to Wagner ||
A) FORMULAS - 1. Definition of a formula :: 2. Presentation of the little catalogue of harmonic vocabulary :: 3. User's guide to the little catalogue and various instructions :: 4. Examples illustrating the little catalogue (motifs: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6a, 6b, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, motifs in combination)
B) SEQUENCES - 1. Definition of a harmonic sequence :: 2. Classifying sequences :: 3. Melodic formulations: characteristic motifs :: 4. The tonal nature of the harmonic sequence :: 5.The tripartite structure of the harmonic sequence :: 6. A modulating sequence or not? :: 7. Diversification of harmonic content :: 8. The harmonic sequence as a place of subversion :: 9. Conclusion

4. EXAMPLES ILLUSTRATING THE LITTLE CATALOGUE

Motif no 2

It is interesting to note that it is motif no 2 that supports the greatest number of different harmonic formulas.

Example 82 : F. Schubert : Symphony no 5, D. 485, III, Allegro molto (mm 63-69)


Example 83 : R. Schumann : Dichterliebe, op. 48, no 12 (mm 1-3)


Example 84 : A. Vivaldi : Concerto in D minor


Example 85 : L.V. Beethoven : Symphony no 5, op. 67, I (mm 18-21)


Example 86 : L.V. Beethoven : String quartet, op. 18, no 4, IV, Allegro (mm 6-12)


Example 87 : F. Chopin : Mazurka, op. 30, no 2 (mm 18-24)
In this example, motif no 2 appears within the context of several tonicizations:


Example 88 : R. Schumann : Albumblätter, op. 124, no 4 (end)


Example 89 : F. Mendelssohn : Sonata for cello and piano, op. 45, II, Andante (mm 1-4)


Example 90 : L.V. Beethoven : Symphony no 4, op. 60, I, Allegro vivace (mm 173-177)


Example 91 : F. Liszt : Harmonies poétiques et religieuses no 3, end (mm 356-362)


Example 92 : F. Schubert : Der Wanderer, op. 4, no 1, Sehr Langsam (mm 25-26)


a

Example 93 : N. Rimsky-Korsakov : Scheherazade, op. 35, III, Grazioso (mm 74-76)


a

Example 94 : W.A. Mozart : Sonata for violin and piano, K. 379, Allegro (mm 9-12)


Example 95 : R. Schumann : Symphonic Etudes, op. 13, no 9, Presto possibile (mm 37-40)



 

Example 96 : G. Verdi : La Traviata, Act I, (end)


a

Example 97 : J.S. Bach : The Well-Tempered Clavier, vol. I, Prelude no 22, BWV 867 (mm 10-11)


Example 98 : W.A. Mozart : Sonata for violin and piano, K. 379, II, var. 4, Allegro (mm 1-5)


a

Example 99 : F. Schubert : Winterreise, D. 911, no 7, Auf dem Flusse, (mm 68-74)


Example 100 : F. Schubert : Fantasy, op. 103, Allegro molto moderato (mm 561-563)


 

Example 101 : W.A. Mozart : String Quartet, K. 428, I, Allegro non troppo (mm 85-90)


 

Example 102 : J. Brahms : Symphony no 1, op. 68, IV, Piu Allegro (mm 13-19)


Example 103 : G.F. Handel : Messiah, no 29 (mm 1-5)


 

This pair will be explained in detail in the section dedicated to harmonic sequences.

Example 104 : J. Brahms : Symphony no 3, op. 90, I (mm 21-23)


Example 105 : R. Wagner : Rienzi, Overture (end)


The next two examples illustrate the appearance of several functions (N and V of V) built on the first note of motif no 2:

Example 106 : W.A. Mozart : Don Giovanni, K. 527, Overture (mm 23-30)


Example 107 : F. Chopin : Piano sonata no 3, op. 58, Largo (mm 109-113)



motif no 3